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Natural family planning
Question from JB on 5/9/2019:

How do you explain to a non catholic that having a vasectomy is wrong? What are the long term effects of having a vasectomy?

Answer by Judie Brown on 5/16/2019:

I think this response from Father Torraco could help your non-catholic friend:

The Church's teaching on sterilization is based upon the natural moral law, and the two related principles, the principle of totality and the principle of double effect. Surgery or suppressive therapy within the human generative system has two distinct effects in the moral order. On the one hand, there is the physical removal of an organ or the suppression of its function in the interests of the whole body. This therapeutic effect must be judged in the light of the principle of totality, according to which a part of the body that threatens the whole of the body may be removed morally justifiably. On the other hand, the removal of a generative organ or the suppression of its function results in a limitation of the procreative faculty. This is the contraceptive effect. If the procedure were undertaken precisely as a contraceptive measure, even if in the interests of the whole body, this would be direct or contraceptive sterilization and would be contrary to Catholic teaching on contraception. Direct or contraceptive sterilization cannot be morally justified by the principle of totality. Direct or contraceptive sterilization must be distinguished from indirect sterilization, which is morally justifiable in the light of the principle of double effect. Generative organs have two distinct aspects or functions: as endocrine glands they serve the good of the individual, but also as generative organs they are oriented by nature beyond the individual. The testicle, for example, is both an endocrine gland producing hormones for the well being of the individual and as such comes under the principle of totality. But the testicle also has a generative function, producing sperm. This function, as generative, is not so subordinated to or oriented solely to the good of the individual, but beyond the individual, to the propagation of the human race and the good of humanity. Thus, the natural order is violated if the generative function is suppressed for the sake of the individuals who possess it. However, under the principle of totality the endocrine function may be suppressed for the individual's well being. Under the principle of double effect, it is possible for even the entire organ to be removed if it is the site of a dangerous pathology.

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